vision impairment

Is audio description provided by museum staff or is it a profession like sign language interpreters?

Providing effective audio description is a technical skill that is being learned by professional audio describers in many cities. It began in towns where patrons with vision loss wanted to attend live theater; but now Describers are also working in museums and on guided tours.  If you want to know who provides audio description in your area, contact your local ADA Center at 1-800-949-4232.

Do restaurants have to provide Braille menus?

No. It might be an undue administrative or financial burden for a restaurant to print a new Braille menu every time they change an item or price.

However, it is not appropriate for a request for a Braille menu to be answered with simply “we don’t have any.” Restaurant staff should be trained on how to properly provide the information from the menu to guests so they can make their choices from the full menu.

If we have hand-outs at our seminar do they all have to be in Braille?

Material in an accessible format, such as Braille, is an example of an auxiliary aid that can be provided on an as-needed basis.  However, knowing your audience is key.

Promotional and registration materials for the seminar should include and explain how the public may request a particular auxiliary aid or service. This information should include contact information and a deadline for requesting individualized accommodations to ensure there is enough time to order or produce the Braille materials.