Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)

If we have hand-outs at our seminar do they all have to be in Braille?

Material in an accessible format, such as Braille, is an example of an auxiliary aid that can be provided on an as-needed basis.  However, knowing your audience is key.

Promotional and registration materials for the seminar should include and explain how the public may request a particular auxiliary aid or service. This information should include contact information and a deadline for requesting individualized accommodations to ensure there is enough time to order or produce the Braille materials.

I am hosting an event at a hotel. Who is responsible for providing wheelchair access to the stage?

Both the hotel and the public entity or private business renting the hotel meeting space have responsibilities under the ADA to ensure that everyone regardless of disability has an equal opportunity to enjoy the services and facilities offered by your event.

If the hotel provides temporary stages or raised platforms, they must make these temporary elements accessible to people with disabilities unless doing so would result in an undue administrative or financial burden.

We are providing meals at our conference. An attendee said she has food allergies. Do we need to have a special meal prepared for her?

In order to be viewed as a disability under the ADA, an impairment must substantially limit one or more major life activities. An individual's major life activities of respiratory or neurological functioning may be substantially limited by allergies or sensitivity to a degree that he or she is a person with a disability.  For example this may include an individual with severe nut allergies, the symptoms of which may include difficulty swallowing and breathing.

If I am using my facility to host a job fair, must I provide a sign language interpreter?

  • When is an organization or business required to provide an interpreter?

Public entities and private businesses have responsibilities under the ADA to furnish appropriate auxiliary aids and services where necessary to ensure effective communication with individuals with disabilities. A qualified sign language interpreter is considered an auxiliary aid or service.

Our town has a crafts workshop every spring. Some presenters use big heavy extension cords to run their equipment. Do we have to do anything to cover them?

Buildings or outdoor venues designed for complete accessibility can become inaccessible without proper attention when setting up temporary events such as your crafts workshop.  A poorly placed extension cord can make your crafts workshop venue unusable to people with mobility disabilities. In regards to the ADA, the extension cords need to be addressed if they are obstructing the accessible route or access to craft workshop activities for people with disabilities.

What are some things vets can do?

  • For more information, go the the Making Work Happen website [makingworkhappen.com] and find the Veterans Tutorial.
  • Think through how you want to talk about your disability or disclose it.  Unless you are asking for an accommodation, you do not have to disclose your disability to an employer either during hiring or employment.  Whether you decide to disclose depends on a number of factors:  Your feelings about your disability, whether you need a workplace a

What are some things employers can do?

  • For more information on this, go to the Making Work Happen website [makingworkhappen.com] and find the employer’s a tutorial on veterans with disabilities in the workplace.
  • Consider the workplace climate and culture.  Is there a climate of trust and openness around disability and accommodation?  What actually happens to people with disabilities when they come forward with an accommodation request?  Is there a quick and effective response?  Or is this the first road to termination?  What happens to people with d

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