state & local government (ADA Title II)

Are the effective communication requirements different for a state or local government than for a private business? 

State and local governments must give primary consideration to what the person with a disability requests.  So if this same person who is Deaf plans to attend a City Council meeting and requests an interpreter, the city must provide it unless doing that would somehow be impossible - maybe because the request was just made the morning of the meeting and no interpreter could be found on such short notice.  However, the city must make a good faith effort to secure the services of an interpreter.

If I am using my facility to host a job fair, must I provide a sign language interpreter?

  • When is an organization or business required to provide an interpreter?

Public entities and private businesses have responsibilities under the ADA to furnish appropriate auxiliary aids and services where necessary to ensure effective communication with individuals with disabilities. A qualified sign language interpreter is considered an auxiliary aid or service.

Our town has a crafts workshop every spring. Some presenters use big heavy extension cords to run their equipment. Do we have to do anything to cover them?

Buildings or outdoor venues designed for complete accessibility can become inaccessible without proper attention when setting up temporary events such as your crafts workshop.  A poorly placed extension cord can make your crafts workshop venue unusable to people with mobility disabilities. In regards to the ADA, the extension cords need to be addressed if they are obstructing the accessible route or access to craft workshop activities for people with disabilities.

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